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Impington Village College

Personal Development

Key concepts of Personal wellbeing key stage 3 

1.1 Personal Identities

a. Understanding that identity is affected by a range of factors, including a positive sense of self.

b. Recognising that the way in which personal qualities, attitudes, skills and achievements are evaluated affects confidence and self-esteem.

c. Understanding that self-esteem can change with personal circumstances, such as those associated with family and friendships, achievements and employment.

1.2 Healthy Lifestyles

a. Recognising that healthy lifestyles, and the wellbeing of self and others, depend on information and making responsible choices.

b. Understanding that physical, mental, sexual and emotional health affect our ability to lead fulfilling lives, and that there is help and support available when they are threatened.

c. Dealing with growth and change as normal parts of growing up.

1.3 Risk

a. Understanding risk in both positive and negative terms and understanding that individuals need to manage risk to themselves and others in a range of situations, including online.

b. Appreciating that pressure can be used positively or negatively to influence others in situations involving risk.

c. Developing the confidence to try new ideas and face challenges safely, individually and in groups.

1.4 Relationships

a. Understanding that relationships affect everything we do in our lives and that relationship skills have to be learnt and practiced.

b. Understanding that people have multiple roles and responsibilities in society and that making positive relationships and contributing to groups, teams and communities is important.

c. Understanding that relationships can cause strong feelings and emotions.

1.5 Diversity

a. Appreciating that, in our communities, there are similarities as well as differences between people of different race, religion, culture, ability or disability, gender, age or sexual orientation.

b. Understanding that all forms of prejudice and discrimination must be challenged at every level in our lives.

2.1 Critical Reflection

a. Reflect critically on their own and others’ values.

b. Reflect on personal strengths, achievements and areas for development.

c. Recognise how others see them and give and receive feedback.

d. Identify and use strategies for setting and meeting personal targets in order to increase motivation.

e. Reflect on feelings and identify positive ways of understanding, managing and expressing strong emotions and challenging behaviour.

f. Develop self-awareness by reflecting critically on their behaviour and its impact on others.

2.2 Decision-Making and Managing Risk

a. Find information and support from a variety of sources.

b. Assess and manage the element of risk in personal choices and situations.

c. Use strategies for resisting unhelpful peer influence and pressure.

d. Know when and how to get help.

e. Identify how managing feelings and emotions effectively supports decision-making and risk management.

2.3 Developing Relationships and Working With Others

a. Use social skills to build and maintain a range of positive relationships.

b. Use the social skill of negotiation within relationships, recognising their rights and responsibilities and that their actions have consequences.

c. Use the social skills of communication, negotiation, assertiveness and collaboration.

d. Value differences between people and demonstrate empathy and a willingness to learn about people different from themselves.

e. Challenge prejudice and discrimination assertively.

The Study of Personal Wellbeing Includes:

a. Examples of diverse values encountered in society and the clarification of personal values.

b. The knowledge and skills needed for setting realistic targets and personal goals.

c. Physical and emotional change and puberty.

d. Sexual activity, human reproduction, contraception, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections and HIV and how high-risk behaviours affect the health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities.

e. Facts and laws about drug, alcohol and tobacco use and misuse, and the personal and social consequences of misuse for themselves and others.

f. How a balanced diet and making choices for being healthy contribute to personal wellbeing, and the importance of balance between work, leisure and exercise.

g. Ways of recognising and reducing risk, minimising harm and getting help in emergency and risky situations.

h. A knowledge of basic first aid.

i. The features of positive and stable relationships, how to deal with a breakdown in a relationship and the effects of loss and bereavement.

j. Different types of relationships, including those within families and between older and young people, boys and girls, and people of the same sex, including civil partnerships.

k. The nature and importance of marriage and of stable relationships for family life and bringing up children.

l. The roles and responsibilities of parents, carers and children in families.

m. The similarities, differences and diversity among people of different race, culture, ability, disability, gender, age and sexual orientation and the impact of prejudice, bullying, discrimination and racism on individuals and communities.

Key concepts of Economic wellbeing and financial capability key stage 3 

1.1 Career

a. Understanding that everyone has a ‘career’.

b. Developing a sense of personal identity for career progression.

c. Understanding the qualities, attitudes and skills needed for employability.

1.2 Capability

a. Exploring what it means to be enterprising.

b. Learning how to manage money and personal finances.

c. Understanding how to make creative and realistic plans for transition.

d. Becoming critical consumers of goods and services.

1.3 Risk

a. Understanding risk in both positive and negative terms.

b. Understanding the need to manage risk in the context of financial and career choices.

c. Taking risks and learning from mistakes.

1.4 Economic Understanding

a. Understanding the economic and business environment.

b. Understanding the functions and uses of money.

2.1 Self-Development

a. Develop and maintain their self-esteem and envisage a positive future for themselves in work.

b. Identify major life roles and ways of managing the relationships between them.

c. Assess their needs, interests, values, skills, abilities and attitudes in relation to options in learning, work and enterprise.

d. Review their experiences and achievements.

2.2 Exploration

a. Use a variety of information sources to explore options and choices in career and financial contexts.

b. Recognise bias and inaccuracies in information about learning pathways, work and enterprise.

c. Investigate the main trends in employment and relate these to their career plans.

2.3 Enterprise

Students should be able to:

a. Identify the main qualities and skills needed to enter and thrive in the working world.

b. Assess, undertake and manage risk.

c. Take action to improve their chances in their career.

d. Manage change and transition.

e. Use approaches to working with others, problem-solving and action planning.

f. Understand and apply skills and qualities for enterprise.

g. Demonstrate and apply understanding of economic ideas.

2.4 Financial capability

Students should be able to:

a. Manage their money.

b. Understand financial risk and reward.

c. Explain financial terms and products.

d. Identify how finance will play an important part in their lives and in achieving their aspirations.

The Study of Economic Wellbeing and Financial Capability Includes:

a. Different types of work, including employment, self-employment and voluntary work.

b. Work roles and identities.

c. The range of opportunities in learning and work and changing patterns of employment (local, national, European and global).

d. The personal review and planning process.

e. Skills and qualities in relation to employers’ needs.

f. A range of economic and business terms, including the effect of competition on product and price.

g. Personal budgeting, money management and a range of financial products and services.

h. Risk and reward, and how money can make money through savings, investment and trade.

i. How businesses use finance.

j. Social and moral dilemmas about the use of money.

Key concepts of Citizenship key stage 3 

1.1 Democracy and Justice

a. Participating actively in different kinds of decision-making and voting in order to influence public life.

b. Weighing up what is fair and unfair in different situations, understanding that justice is fundamental to a democratic society and exploring the role of law in maintaining order and resolving conflict.

c. Considering how democracy, justice, diversity, toleration, respect and freedom are valued by people with different beliefs, backgrounds and traditions within a changing democratic society.

d. Understanding and exploring the roles of citizens and parliament in holding government and those in power to account.

1.2 Rights and Responsibilities

a. Exploring different kinds of rights and obligations and how these affect both individuals and communities.

b. Understanding that individuals, organisations and governments have responsibilities to ensure that rights are balanced, supported and protected.

c. Investigating ways in which rights can compete and conflict, and understanding that hard decisions have to be made to try to balance these.

1.3 Identities and Diversity: Living Together in the UK

a. Appreciating that identities are complex, can change over time and are informed by different understandings of what it means to be a citizen in the UK.

b. Exploring the diverse national, regional, ethnic and religious cultures, groups and communities in the UK and the connections between them.

c. Considering the interconnections between the UK and the rest of Europe and the wider world.

d. Exploring community cohesion and the different forces that bring about change in communities over time.

2.1 Critical Thinking and Enquiry

a. Engage with and reflect on different ideas, opinions, beliefs and values when exploring topical and controversial issues and problems.

b. Research, plan and undertake enquiries into issues and problems using a range of information and sources.

c. Analyse and evaluate sources used, questioning different values, ideas and viewpoints and recognising bias.

2.2 Advocacy and Representation

a. Express and explain their own opinions to others through discussions, formal debates and voting.

b. Communicate an argument, taking account of different viewpoints and drawing on what they have learnt through research, action and debate.

c. Justify their argument, giving reasons to try to persuade others to think again, change or support them.

d. Represent the views of others, with which they may or may not agree.

2.3 Taking Informed and Responsible Action

a. Explore creative approaches to taking action on problems and issues to achieve intended purposes.

b. Work individually and with others to negotiate, plan and take action on citizenship issues to try to influence others, bring about change or resist unwanted change, using time and resources appropriately.

c. Analyse the impact of their actions on communities and the wider world, now and in the future.

d. Reflect on the progress they have made, evaluating what they have learnt, what went well, the difficulties encountered and what they would do differently.

The Study of Citizenship Includes:

a. Political, legal and human rights, and responsibilities of citizens.

b. The roles of the law and the justice system and how they relate to young people.

c. Key features of parliamentary democracy and government in the constituent parts of the UK and at local level, including voting and elections.

d. Freedom of speech and diversity of views, and the role of the media in informing and influencing public opinion and holding those in power to account.

e. Actions that individuals, groups and organisations can take to influence decisions affecting communities and the environment.

f. Strategies for handling local and national disagreements and conflicts.

g. The needs of the local community and how these are met through public services and the voluntary sector.

h. How economic decisions are made, including where public money comes from and who decides how it is spent.

i. The changing nature of UK society, including the diversity of ideas, beliefs, cultures, identities, traditions, perspectives and values that are shared.

j. Migration to, from and within the UK and the reasons for this.

k. The UK’s relations with the European Union and the rest of Europe, the Commonwealth, the United Nations and the world as a global community.

Key concepts of Personal wellbeing key stage 4 

1.1 Personal Identities

a. Understanding that identity is affected by a range of factors, including a positive sense of self.

b. Recognising that the way in which personal qualities, attitudes, skills and achievements are evaluated affects confidence and self-esteem.

c. Understanding that self-esteem can change with personal circumstances, such as those associated with family and friendships, achievement and employment.

1.2 Healthy Lifestyles

a. Recognising that healthy lifestyles, and the wellbeing of self and others, depend on information and making responsible choices.

b. Understanding that our physical, mental, sexual and emotional health affect our ability to lead fulfilling lives and that there is help and support available when they are threatened.

c. Dealing with growth and change as normal parts of growing up.

1.3 Risk

a. Understanding risk in both positive and negative terms and understanding that individuals need to manage risk to themselves and others in a range of personal and social situations, in face to face situations and online.

b. Appreciating that pressure can be used positively or negatively to influence others in situations involving risk.

c. Developing the confidence to try new ideas and face challenges safely, individually and in groups.

1.4 Relationships

a. Understanding that relationships affect everything we do in our lives and that relationship skills have to be learnt and practiced.

b. Understanding that people have multiple roles and responsibilities in society and that making positive relationships and contributing to groups, teams and communities is important.

c. Understanding that relationships can cause strong feelings and emotions.

1.5 Diversity

a. Appreciating that, in our communities, there are similarities as well as differences between people of different race, religion, culture, ability or disability, gender, age or sexual orientation.

b. Understanding that all forms of prejudice and discrimination must be challenged at every level in our lives.

These are the essential skills and processes in personal wellbeing that students need to learn to make progress.

2.1 Critical Reflection

Students should be able to:

a. Reflect critically on their own and others’ values and change their behaviour accordingly.

b. Reflect on their own and others’ strengths and achievements, give and receive constructive praise and criticism, and learn from success and failure.

c. Identify and use strategies for setting and meeting personal targets and challenges in order to increase motivation, reflect on their effectiveness and implement and monitor strategies for achieving goals.

d. Reflect on feelings and identify positive ways of understanding, managing and expressing strong emotions and challenging behaviour, acting positively on them.

e. Develop self-awareness by reflecting critically on their behaviour and its impact on others.

2.2 Decision-Making and Managing Risk

a. Use knowledge and understanding to make informed choices about personal safety, esafety, health and wellbeing, evaluating personal choices and making changes if necessary.

b. Find and evaluate information, advice and support from a variety of sources and be able to support others in doing so c. assess and manage risk in personal choices and situations, minimise harm in risky situations and demonstrate how to help others do so.

d. Use strategies for resisting unhelpful peer influence and pressure, assessing when to use them and when and how to get help.

e. Identify how managing feelings and emotions effectively supports decision-making and risk management.

2.3 Developing Relationships and Working With Others

a. Use social skills to build and maintain a range of positive relationships, reflect upon what makes these successful and apply this to new situations.

b. Use the social skill of negotiation within relationships, recognising their rights and responsibilities and that their actions have consequences.

c. Work individually, together and in teams for specific purposes, making use of the social skills of communication, negotiation, assertiveness and collaboration.

d. Demonstrate respect for and acceptance of the differences between people, and challenge offensive behaviour, prejudice and discrimination assertively and safely.

e. Explore feelings and emotions related to changing relationships and develop skills to cope with loss and bereavement.

The Study of Personal Wellbeing Includes:

a. The effect of diverse and conflicting values on individuals, families and communities and ways of responding to them.

b. How the media portrays young people, body image and health issues.

c. The characteristics of emotional and mental health, and the causes, symptoms and treatments of some mental and emotional health disorders.

d. The benefits and risks of health and lifestyle choices, including choices relating to sexual activity and substance use and misuse, and the short and long-term consequences for the health and mental and emotional wellbeing of individuals, families and communities.

e. Where and how to obtain health information, how to recognise and follow health and safety procedures, ways of reducing risk and minimising harm in risky situations, how to find sources of emergency help and how to use basic and emergency first aid.

f. Characteristics of positive relationships, and awareness of exploitation in relationships and of statutory and voluntary organisations that support relationships in crisis.

g. The roles and responsibilities of parents, carers, children and other family members.

h. Parenting skills and qualities and their central importance to family life.

i. The impact of separation, divorce and bereavement on families and the need to adapt to changing circumstances.

j. The diversity of ethnic and cultural groups, the power of prejudice, bullying, discrimination and racism, and the need to take the initiative in challenging this and other offensive behaviours and in giving support to victims of abuse.

Key concepts of Economic wellbeing and financial capability key stage 4 

1.1 Career

a. Understanding that everyone has a ‘career’.

b. Developing a sense of personal identity for career progression.

c. Understanding the qualities, attitudes and skills needed for employability.

1.2 Capability

a. Exploring what it means to be enterprising.

b. Learning how to manage money and personal finances.

c. Understanding how to make creative and realistic plans for transition.

d. Becoming critical consumers of goods and services.

1.3 Risk

a. Understanding risk in both positive and negative terms.

b. Understanding the need to manage risk in the context of financial and career choices.

c. Taking risks and learning from mistakes.

1.4 Economic Understanding

a. Understanding the economic and business environment.

b. Understanding the functions and uses of money.

2.1 Self-Development

a. Develop and maintain their self-esteem and envisage a positive future for themselves in work.

b. Identify major life roles and ways of managing the relationships between them.

c. Assess their needs, interests, values, skills, abilities and attitudes in relation to options in learning, work and enterprise.

d. Assess the importance of their experiences and achievements in relation to their future plans.

2.2 Exploration

a. Identify, select and use a range of information sources to research, clarify and review options and choices in career and financial contexts relevant to their needs.

b. Recognise bias and inaccuracies in information about learning pathways, work and enterprise.

c. Investigate the main trends in employment and relate these to their career plans.

2.3 Enterprise

a. Identify the main qualities and skills needed to enter and thrive in the working world.

b. Assess, undertake and manage risk.

c. Take action to improve their chances in their career.

d. Manage change and transition.

e. Show drive and self-reliance when working on work-related tasks.

f. Develop approaches to working with others, problem-solving and action planning.

g. Understand the key attitudes for enterprise, including self-reliance, open-mindedness, respect for evidence, pragmatism and commitment to making a difference.

h. Develop and apply skills and qualities for enterprise.

i. Demonstrate and apply understanding of economic ideas.

2.4 Financial Capability

a. Manage their money.

b. Understand financial risk and reward.

c. Explain financial terms and products.

d. Identify how finance will play an important part in their lives and in achieving their aspirations.

The Study of Economic Wellbeing and Financial Capability Includes:

a. Different types of work, including employment, self-employment and voluntary work.

b. The organisation and structure of different types of businesses, and work roles and identities.

c. Rights and responsibilities at work and attitudes and values in relation to work and enterprise.

d. The range of opportunities in learning and work and changing patterns of employment (local, national, European and global).

e. The personal review and planning process.

f. Skills and qualities in relation to employers’ needs.

g. A range of economic and business terms, including the connections between markets, competition, price and profit.

h. Personal budgeting, wages, taxes, money management, credit, debt and a range of financial products and services.

i. Risk and reward, and how money can make money through savings, investment and trade.

j. How and why businesses use finance.

k. Social and moral dilemmas about the use of money.

Key concepts of Citizenship key stage 4 

There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of citizenship. Students need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.

1.1 Democracy and Justice

a. Participating actively in different kinds of decision-making and voting in order to influence public life.

b. Weighing up what is fair and unfair in different situations, understanding that justice is fundamental to a democratic society and exploring the role of law in maintaining order and resolving conflict.

c. Considering how democracy, justice, diversity, toleration, respect and freedom are valued by people with different beliefs, backgrounds and traditions within a changing democratic society.

d. Understanding and exploring the roles of citizens and parliament in holding government and those in power to account.

1.2 Rights and Responsibilities

a. Exploring different kinds of rights and obligations and how these affect both individuals and communities.

b. Understanding that individuals, organisations and governments have responsibilities to ensure that rights are balanced, supported and protected.

c. Investigating ways in which rights can compete and conflict, and understanding that hard decisions have to be made to try to balance these.

1.3 Identities and Diversity: Living Together in the UK

a. Appreciating that identities are complex, can change over time and are informed by different understandings of what it means to be a citizen in the UK.

b. Exploring the diverse national, regional, ethnic and religious cultures, groups and communities in the UK and the connections between them.

c. Considering the interconnections between the UK and the rest of Europe and the wider world.

d. Exploring community cohesion and the different forces that bring about change in communities over time.

2.1 Critical Thinking and Enquiry

a. Question and reflect on different ideas, opinions, assumptions, beliefs and values when exploring topical and controversial issues and problems.

b. Research, plan and undertake enquiries into issues and problems, using a range of information, sources and methods.

c. Interpret and analyse critically sources used, identifying different values, ideas and viewpoints and recognising bias.

d. Evaluate different viewpoints, exploring connections and relationships between viewpoints and actions in different contexts (from local to global).

2.2 Advocacy and Representation

a. Evaluate critically different ideas and viewpoints including those with which they do not necessarily agree.

b. Explain their viewpoint, drawing conclusions from what they have learnt through research, discussion and actions, including formal debates and votes.

c. Present a convincing argument that takes account of, and represents, different viewpoints, to try to persuade others to think again, change or support them.

2.3 Taking Informed and Responsible Action

a. Explore creative approaches to taking action on problems and issues to achieve intended purposes.

b. Research, initiate and plan action to address citizenship issues, working individually and with others.

c. Negotiate, decide on and take action to try to influence others, bring about change or resist unwanted change, managing time and resources appropriately.

d. Assess critically the impact of their actions on communities and the wider world, now and in the future, and make recommendations to others for further action.

e. Reflect on the progress they have made, evaluating what they have learnt from the intended and unintended consequences of action, and the contributions of others as well as themselves.

The Study of Citizenship Includes:

a. Political, legal and human rights and freedoms in a range of contexts from local to global.

b. The roles and operation of civil and criminal law and the justice system.

c. How laws are made and shaped by people and processes, including the work of parliament, government and the courts.

d. Actions citizens can take in democratic and electoral processes to influence decisions locally, nationally and beyond.

e. The operation of parliamentary democracy within the UK and of other forms of government, both democratic and non-democratic, beyond the UK.

f. The development of, and struggle for, different kinds of rights and freedoms (speech, opinion, association and the vote) in the UK.

g. How information is used in public debate and policy formation, including information from the media and from pressure and interest groups.

h. The impact and consequences of individual and collective actions on communities, including the work of the voluntary sector.

i. Policies and practices for sustainable development and their impact on the environment.

j. The economy in relation to citizenship, including decisions about the collection and allocation of public money.

k. The rights and responsibilities of consumers, employers and employees.

l. The origins and implications of diversity and the changing nature of society in the UK, including the perspectives and values that are shared or common, and the impact of migration and integration on identities, groups and communities.

m. The UK’s role in the world, including in Europe, the European Union, the Commonwealth and the United Nations.

n. The challenges facing the global community, including international disagreements and conflict, and debates about inequalities, sustainability and use of the world’s resources.